Easy Homemade Fermented Mayo Recipe

Easy Homemade Fermented Mayo Recipe

Finally! An easy homemade mayo recipe that maintains fridge freshness for months, while also making it more nutritious–all you need is a little yogurt!

I QUIT MAKING HOMEMADE MAYO…UNTIL THIS RECIPE!

Mayonnaise made from-scratch can be fairly life altering. Plus, it’s super simple to whip up if you have a food processor or immersion blender. 

The only problem is that the fridge life is incredibly short (less than a week). And honey, I  ain’t got time (or patience) to be bothered with making too much (or not enough) of a condiment that is too delicious (and essential) not to have on hand when I need it!  

Too many home cooks, including me, give up making homemade mayo because it spoils too fast, so you settle for the store stuff. 

Well, not anymore…keep scrolling! 

WANT YOUR HOMEMADE MAYO TO LAST LONGER? FERMENT IT. 

A number of condiments, including mayo, have a long list of unpronounceable ‘faux’ ingredients used to extend shelf life or add synthetic flavor, texture, and nutrients  after the original goodness is processed out. So, how does a homecook achieve a similar result without using artificial preservatives or intensive processing methods? 

You do what humans have done for thousands of years to preserve food–you ferment it!

When you ferment a food, you take advantage of the naturally occurring bacteria to convert the sugars into lactic acid, a byproduct that prevents spoilage.

When you culture a food, naturally occurring bacteria convert the sugars in the food into lactic acid or alcohol – both of which prevent spoilage. You can culture almost anything! Dairy is cultured into foods such as yogurt, kefir, buttermilk, and cheese. Vegetables are cultured into sauerkrauts and pickles. Fruits are fermented into chutneys and wine! We even culture grains into sourdough bread, beer, and liquor!

This homemade mayo recipe uses a simple culture starter made from plain yogurt: whey. The whey kickstarts the culturing process, inoculating the food with beneficial bacteria that helps your mayonnaise last longer, adds enzymes and increases nutrient content. 

IT’S EASY (AND HEALTHIER) TO MAKE YOUR OWN HOMEMADE MAYO

Homemade mayo is tastier, healthier, and no longer a processed food when you make it at home. Did you know the following (unnerving) facts about store-bought mayo?

  1. Most of your shelf mayo is made from inferior, chemically engineered oils, like corn oil which is highly refined and may be made from genetically modified crops, if the wrong manufacturer is chosen.   
  2. Low-fat versions of store bought mayo are made with egg whites. To replace the fat from the missing egg yolk, modified food starches are added so that the low-fat mayonnaise retains the creamy texture and thickness of real mayonnaise. These food starches can be made from corn, gums…wierd, and why?  
  3. Preservatives such as calcium disodium EDTA are added to increase shelf-life. Preliminary research and studies suggest that the chemical build up of EDTA in the body causes  significant toxicity after long-term use. 

Mixing a handful of whole, raw ingredients from scratch is the only way to avoid questionable preservatives. 

WHAT CAN I DO WITH MY HOMEMADE MAYO?

You mean what can’t you do with your homemade mayo? Darlin’ you’ll be putting this spread in everything from cakes (chocolate and pancakes) to dinner favorites. Take a look:

Want the recipes featured in the video? Click below.

Chocolate mayo cake

Chocolate mayo icing

Potoato Salad

Ranch Dressing

DOES FERMENTED MAYO TASTE DIFFERENT THAN REGULAR MAYO? 

Honey, I’m here to help ya’ not hassle ya and I LOVE that I made the switch without my family without even knowing! In fact, I’d be surprised if the uninitiated could even tell it’s fermented at all. 

Still nervous? Try this. The first time I made this recipe, I already assembled the sandwiches spread with my homemade mayo.  I gave them to my family and waited until only crumbs were left on the plate to announce that I had made the mayo!  They obviously didn’t have any objections (or suspicions)  because they ate everything. After this, there was no looking back and they knew to stop looking the Hellman’s and instead reach for the homemade mason jar for mayo. 

(Pssst, a few months after  they were hooked on homemade mayo, I told them the recipe was fermented…just sayin’)

In a side-by-side comparison of homemade vs. store-bought there are only a few subtle differences:

  • Homemade mayo has a tinge more of a yellow hue compared to the bright white of store-bought.
  • Fermented mayo has a very subtle pleasant tang (that’s not overpowered or weird) generally masked by the mustard and dill used in this recipe. 

WHAT IS A PROBIOTIC LIQUID? WHY LACTO-FERMENTED MAYONNAISE? 

A probiotic liquid is anything that contains active bacteria that promotes lacto-fermentation. Lacto-fermentation significantly increases enzyme concentration and acts as a culture starter to lacto-ferment vegetables, sauces, jams, and even meats! As it turns out, you don’ t need preservatives, you need whey! 

If you strain yogurt using a cheesecloth or nut-milk bag, the cloudy, yellowish liquid that drains away is fresh whey. Whey is low in calories, packed full of protein, vitamins, minerals, enzymes and active bacteria that shouldn’t be wasted. It has many uses and can be stored in the fridge, sealed in an airtight glass jar for up to 6 months or frozen for longer.

Additional sources of probiotic liquid you may already be familiar with include:

  • Kombucha
  • Whey from non-flavored yogurt
  • Beet kvass
  • Water kefir 

DO I HAVE TO USE AN IMMERSION BLENDER?

No- but an immersion blender is an easy solution that gives you fail proof, perfectly emulsified creamy mayo.  Choosing between a whisk, hand mixer, and blender is less about which one you feel is more convenient and more about characteristics you want in your final product. Mayo that’s whisked by hand is saucier and glossier. An immersion blender yields a thicker and creamier product every time. As kitchen appliances go, immersion blenders are relatively inexpensive, typically costing between $30-60 and don’t take much room to store. My favorite one is this Cuisinart Immersion blender.

RECIPE TIPS (READ BEFORE YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE)

  1. Homemade mayonnaise will be slightly more liquid than store-bought versions because it doesn’t have all the fillers. Even though the taste is better from the start, if you need to slowly calibrate yourself or your family to this, you can easily make it thicker if you use 2 egg yolks instead of 2 whole eggs and slightly reduce the oil. 
  2. Not every oil works in this recipe. The best ones are avocado or grapeseed oil.  You’ll want to avoid olive oil because the strong flavor will throw off the taste.  
  3. You can easily customize the flavor profile of your mayo. Considering adding pesto, combinations of fresh herbs, citrus juices or zest, horseradish, Thai Curry Paste, Sriracha or different profiles of white vinegars! 
  4. If whey is the probiotic liquid you choose to use, let the mayonnaise sit at room temperature, well covered, for 5- 7 hours before refrigerating. With whey added, mayonnaise will keep several months and will become firmer with time. Only use whey from plain, regular yogurt.

EASY HOMEMADE FERMENTED MAYO RECIPE

Easy Homemade Lacto-Fermented Mayo Recipe

Finally! A homemade mayo recipe that maintains fridge freshness for months, while also making it more nutritious–all you need is a little whey or brine from an existing ferment.
Prep Time 2 minutes
Servings 1 quart

Equipment

  • Immersion Blender
  • Quart Mason Jar

Ingredients
  

  • 2 eggs (must be room temperature)
  • 1 1/2 tsp mustard
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tbsp lemon juice (white wine vinegar can also be used)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp drained minced garlic
  • 1 1/2 tsp dried herbs (dill gives a classic flavor)
  • 4 tbsp probiotic liquid whey or brine from a ferment (kombucha, sauerkraut, etc.)
  • 2 1/4 cup grapeseed or avocado oil

Instructions
 

  • Pour all ingredients into the mason jar, adding oil last. Give the oil a few seconds to separate to the surface.
  • Place the immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar, keeping it perpendicular to the bottom of the jar. Start blender and allow it to blend until the mix starts to emulsify and the color turns an opaque white.
  • Once the bottom 1/3 is opaque white, start to slowly lift the immersion blender up and down a few times to fully incorporate the oil.
  • Taste mayonnaise for seasoning then add salt, seasonings, lemon juice or extra vinegar to taste.
  • Place a lid on the jar and keep on counter at room temperature for 5-7 hours to ferment.
  • Transfer to the refrigerator and use as you would regular mayo!

WHEN DOES THIS RECIPE EXPIRE? 

This mayo recipe will stay fresh for up to 3 months when refrigerated. 

IS HOMEMADE MAYO SAFE? WILL THIS MAKE ME SICK?

Homemade mayonnaise is not the culprit for food poisoning at home or your next picnic. In fact, its high acidity helps keep food safe. More likely, unsanitary handling and preparation of food used with the mayonnaise—such as chicken, ham, or potatoes—is the problem.



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